Awaiting the Messiah: A Musical Advent Calendar {Week 3}

img_2648

Welcome back to our Advent journey with Handel’s Messiah. I’m so glad to have you here for Week 3. If you are joining us for the first time, just jump on in, the weeks and days do not need to build on each other for your family to benefit from this devotion. Your family can begin by simply reading and listening to each day’s selection, and enjoying this week’s music appreciation lesson. For the full list of ways to participate and a little bit of background, you can visit our Overview Post, Week 1 and Week 2. Please share with me how your family is liking this calendar in the comments or on Instagram by tagging me (@barefootabbey) and using #awaitingthemessiah . I look forward to seeing how you family is using these listenings to prepare for Christ’s birth.

{WEEK 3} Playlist

(For supplemental free listening throughout the week)

Dec. 11th, DAY 15:

  • Part 2 “He Was Cut Off Out Of The Land Of The Living” – Accompanied recitative for Tenor (soprano)

  • Part 2 “But Thou Didst Not Leave His Soul In Hell” –  Air for Tenor (Soprano)

Isaiah 53:8

He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken.

Sung Text:

He was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgressions of Thy people was He stricken.

Psalm 16:10

For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption.

Sung Text:

But Thou didst not leave His soul in hell, but Thou didst not leave His soul in hell, nor didst Thou suffer, nor didst Thou suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption. But Thou didst not leave His soul in hell, Thou didst not, Thou didst not His soul in hell, nor didst Thou suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption,  nor didst Thou suffer, nor didst Thou suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption,  nor didst Thou suffer, nor didst Thou suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption.

Psalm 24:7-10

Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, O ye gates; even lift them up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord of hosts, he is the King of glory. Selah.

Sung Text:

Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of Glory shall come in. Who is this King of Glory? The Lord strong and mighty, The Lord mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of Glory shall come in. Who is this King of Glory? The Lord of Hosts, He is the King of Glory.

Dec. 12th, DAY 16:

  • Part 2  “Unto Which Of The Angels Said He” – Recitative for Tenor

  • Part 2 “Let All The Angels Of God Worship Him” – Chorus

Hebrews 1:5

For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

Sung Text:

Unto which of the angels said He at any time: “Thou art My Son, this day have I begotten Thee?”

Hebrews 1:6

And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.

Sung Text:

Let all the angels of God worship Him.

Dec. 13th, DAY 17:

  • Part 2 “Thou Art Gone Up On High” – Air for Bass (Alto)

Psalm 68:18

Thou hast ascended on high, thou hast led captivity captive: thou hast received gifts for men; yea, for the rebellious also, that the Lord God might dwell among them.

Sung Text:

Thou art gone up on high, Thou art gone up on high, Thou hast led captivity captive, Thou hast led captivity captive, and received gifts for men; yea, even from Thine enemies, yea, even from Thine enemies, that the Lord God might dwell among them, that the Lord God might dwell, might dwell among them. Thou art gone up on high, Thou art gone up on high, Thou hast led captivity captive, Thou hast led captivity captive, and received gifts for men; yea, even from Thine enemies, from Thine enemies, that the Lord God might dwell among them,that the Lord God might dwell among them, that the Lord God, that the Lord God might dwell among them, might dwell among them, that the Lord God might dwell among them.

  • Part 2 “The Lord Gave The Word” – Chorus

Psalm 68:11

The Lord gave the word: great was the company of those that published it.

Sung Text:

The Lord gave the word; great was the company of the preachers. (overlapping voices)

Dec. 14th, Day 18:

  • Part 2 “How Beautiful Are The Feet Of Them” – Air for Soprano

Romans 10:15

And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!

Sung Text:

How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, How beautiful are the feet, how beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, how beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings, and bring glad tidings, glad tidings of good things, and bring glad tidings, glad tidings of good things, and bring glad tidings, glad tidings of good things, glad tidings of good things.

  • Part 2 “Their Sound Is Gone Out Into All Lands” – Chorus

Romans 10:18

But I say, Have they not heard? Yes verily, their sound went into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the world.

Sung Text:

Their sound is gone out into all lands, and their words unto the ends of the world. (overlapping voices)

Dec. 15th, Day 19:

  • Part 2 “Why Do The Nations So Furiously Rage” – Air for Bass

  • Part 2 “Let Us Break Their Bonds Asunder” – Chorus

Psalm 2:1-2

Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed, saying,

Sung Text:

Why do the nations so furiously rage together? why do the people imagine a vain thing? Why do the nations so furiously rage together? why do the people imagine a vain thing? imagine a vain thing? Why do the nations so furiously rage together, and why do the people, and why do the people imagine a vain thing? Why do the nations so furiously rage together, so furiously together? and why do the people imagine a vain thing? imagine a vain thing? and why do the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth rise up, and the rulers take counsel, take counsel, take counsel together against the Lord, and against His anointed, against the Lord, and His anointed.

Psalm 2:3

Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.

Sung Text:

Let us break their bonds asunder, and cast away their yokes from us. (overlapping voices)

Dec. 16th, DAY 20:

  • Part 2 “He That Dwelleth In Heaven” – Recitative for Tenor

  • Part 2 “Thou Shalt Break Them” – Air for Tenor

Psalm 2:4

 He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision.

Sung Text:

He that dwelleth in Heav’n shall laugh them to scorn; The Lord shall have them in derision.

Psalm 2:9

Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.

Sung Text:

Thou shalt break them, Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel, thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel. Thou shalt break them, Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel, thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel, like a potter’s vessel, thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.

Dec. 17th, DAY 21:

  • Part 2 “Hallelujah!” – Chorus (music appreciation lesson 3 below)

Revelation 19:6

 And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying, Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.

Revelation 11:15

And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

Revelation 19:16

And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written, King Of Kings, And Lord Of Lords.

Sung Text:

Hallelujah: for the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth.

The kingdom of this world is become the kingdom of our Lord,
and of His Christ; and He shall reign for ever and ever.

King of Kings, and Lord of Lords.

Hallelujah!

Music Appreciation Lesson 3

Quite possibly the most well-known piece of all his works, Handel’s “Hallelujah” Chorus concludes the second part of the oratorio, focused of the prophesies of Christ’s passion, and is arguably the climax of the whole composition. While writting it, his servant is said to have discovered him damp-faced and, when later asked about the creation of the movement, Handel revealed, “… I did see all Heaven before me and the great God Himself.” He went on share, “Whether I was in my body or out of my body as I wrote it I know not. God himself knows.” Whether this vision was due to sleep deprivation and little food during the three week composing session of Messiah or a result of divine inspiration, most will agree that Handel’s setting of the Revelation texts is more than effective in painting the glorious scene of Heaven. Though rhythmically simple, and repetive in motif (musical idea) the ever changing,  through composed form (the musical form where different themes are presented without repeat) builds the tention and drama of the piece as the listener themself is brought before the great white throne. The first “Hallelujah”theme is a jubilant, forte (“loud”, musical volume dynamic f) greeting in homophonic texture (all parts singing together rythmically), punctuated by rests between each word as exclamation points. This uniform texture (the way the parts of music mix) continues through the “For the Lord God omnipotent” theme until the text is repeated and a “Hallelujah” motive is reintroduced. The majority of this movement is some dynamic of forte with the exception of the theme beginning with “The kingdom of this world.” This theme adds interest as it starts as piano (p, musical volume dynamic for “soft”) and increases to mezzo forte (moderately loud, mf) and finally returns to forte once again in the phrase where Christ is mentioned. The fugal theme of “And He shall reign forever” introduces a pattern of ascending pitch that climbs high and higher, as though also ascending to heaven, with each sung phrase. Subtly it goes on and on, continuing through the “King of Kings” vocal theme. The exclamatory rests return for all parts, including portions of the instrumental accompaniment, with the text “King of Kings” and “Lord of Lords.” Without relent, it carries the listener full circle back to the “Hallelujah” motif and draws us closer in to the foot of the throne, to worship as well, through the deceleration in the note values of the final three measures.

For our lessons this Advent, we will be using our family’s easy ABC method for listening with purpose. It is a simple three step process that can be used with the whole family and all ages. Your family will be listening to the piece three times, but with a different purpose and activity each time. The whole lesson should take about 15 minutes if you include all three steps. This method is intentionally adaptable to fit all families. Read through the lesson beforehand and pull out and use what you know will work with your child(ren).please don’t hesitate to include the youngest of children. My adorable, 18 month old goddaughter just dances to the music, which is perfect for that age!  If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to leave a comment. I want these lessons to be as user friendly as possible!

Our Easy ABCs for Music Appreciation

Begin by gathering everyone together for your listening time and explain how your family will be using this Advent calendar as well as the name of this movement. Since the lesson falls on Saturday this week, instead of a printable there are a few different versions of Handel’s “Hallelujah” Chorus for your family members to compare and discuss. What version is y’all’s favorite? Feel free to share in the comments below.

You can share what you like from above and the following or use it as an easy script:

Today we will be learning about one of Handel’s most famous pieces, the “Hallelujah” Chorus. It is through composed meaning that it has many different part instead of parts that are played over and over. Many of the different voices and instruments are doing the same thing at times during this piece. The way the different musical parts work together is called the texture in music. When all the parts are doing the same thing, the texture is described as homophonic. It is similar to English and homonyms where a word sounds the same but has another meaning. Writing this music brough him to tears and it is tradition for the audience to stand when hearing it. This is because the King of England at the time, George II, stood when he heard it. It was expected that if the King stood then everyone around him must stand as well. To keep with tradition, let’s stand for our first listenting today. But remember, we still need to close our eyes and try very hard to be silent while we listen so we can focus on the music we are hearing.

Now onto the main processes of our Listening ABCs.

A – Attentive Listening

Before you play the piece for the first time, ask your family to close their eyes and listen silently. Ask them to try and get a feeling, picture, or story in their mind of what the music reminds them of.  We really want them to get their imaginations running for this first listening. Ask them to share what they saw in the music. There is no wrong answer to this question.

B – Bodily Movement

For the second listening our eyes should be open and we’re going to add a bodily movement to help our brains connect our memory and the music through kenesthetic learning. Here you can ask you child(ren) to act out the different rhythmic themes they hear in the music or draw the changing textures of the music by using a color for each layer (part). Are all the parts doing the same thing or sharing the same rhythm? How about during this next section of music (theme)? What is different? Choose what will work best for the ages of your children. Our goal here is to foster a love for classical music in our child(ren) without overwhelming them.

C – Conversation

This third listening is where we talk about the elements we hear in the music. Each time your family listens with purpose using these ABCs, they will hear and be able to verbalize more and more. Any observation is welcome and should be praised during this listening. Some may hear and mention a specific instrument like the tympani (drum) at the end. You can also review what being through composed means as well as homophonic. You can also ask which theme was each persons favorite. Possibly someone can tell if the piece is in a major or minor key. Major keys sound happy while minor keys have a sadder tone. The mood of the piece can also be discussed here by asking how the music made your family members feel and sharing your own response. Again there is no wrong answer to this question. Older children who can write down what they heard in the music as well.

 

Some other versions of “Hallelujah” Chorus your family may enjoy:

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Awaiting the Messiah: A Musical Advent Calendar {Week 3}

  1. Hi Genie,
    We are a full week behind in our Messiah study, so perhaps it’s a glitch on my end, but the YouTube videos for week 2 are repeats of Week 1 and the Week 2 videos are found under this week’s post. This turned out well for us, once I found the angel recitatives, because we enjoyed using our printed music maps to follow along. For others who are on track, though, this could be a big problem.
    Thank you for putting this together and sharing it. It is enriching our Advent significantly this year and we are grateful. God bless!

    Like

  2. Hmm… I’m not sure what would cause the video swapping to occur. Did you ever get it to line up with the correct weeks? On my phone everything looks in order for each week.😬 If it is still wonky let me know and I’ll try to dig a little deeper into the issue.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s